Cures for Peyronie’s disease

Peyronie’s disease is a male sexual disease that causes significant penis bending and pain. PD is not a commonly known disease and is not covered in the press as frequently as other male sexual ailments such as Premature Ejaculation and Erectile Dysfunction. But, Peyronie’s disease has been around for centuries and the treatment methods for this disease have slowly but gradually advanced in modern era.

The history of PD

In 1743, French surgeon Francois Gigot de la Peyronie discovered and first described Peyronie’s disease. The initial description of the condition by Francois Gigot de la Peyronie was based on a series of cases he had observed in his own practice. He observed that males with PD typically had thickened penile tissue, resulting in a curvature and difficulties having sex during erection. Frequently, this curvature made sexual activity challenging or impossible. Peyronie also observed that the condition was more prevalent in older individuals and hypothesized that it may be associated with gout or rheumatism.

Following Peyronie’s initial description of the condition, other clinicians began to report cases of what they termed “induratio penis plastica,” or penile induration. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, the condition was inadequately understood, and numerous theories were advanced to explain its cause. Some physicians believed that Peyronie’s Disease was caused by inflammation or trauma to the penile, while others hypothesized that a bacterial or viral infection could be to blame. Later, scientists determined the disease’s two stages. There are two phases: acute and chronic.

The initial phase of Peyronie’s disease is the acute phase, which is marked by penis discomfort and inflammation. During this stage, fibrous scar tissue begins to form, causing the penis to deform or curve during erections. Curvature can be mild or severe and can occur in any direction.

During the acute phase of Peyronie’s disease, the following symptoms may be present:

• Pain or sensitivity of the genitalia

• Enlargement or inflammation

• A mass or ridge in the penis

• Dysfunction of erection

• Difficulties with sexual relations

• Depression or anxiety related to the ailment

In most cases, the acute phase of Peyronie’s disease lasts between 12 to 18 months, although it can last longer.

The second phase of Peyronie’s disease is characterised by the stabilisation of the fibrous scar tissue, which stops developing and becomes harder. During this stage, the penis’ curvature may become more pronounced, and as a consequence, Peyronie’s disease and erectile dysfunction may worsen. In most cases, however, the discomfort and inflammation subside.

The chronic phase of Peyronie’s disease may be characterized by the following symptoms:

• The natural penile curvature during erection

• Dysfunction of erection

• Difficulties with sexual relations

• tension or melancholy due to a medical condition

An excellent source of information for a patient who has recently discovered they have Peyronie’s disease is the UK based Peyronie’s Forum

Ancient Treatments for PD 

There were not many effective remedies for Peyronie’s disease in ancient times, primarily due to a lack of knowledge about the disease and technological advancements. However, this does not imply that there were no treatments for this disease in antiquity. For instance, the person who first discovered Peyronie’s disease recommended spa treatments with mineral water for patients. Later in the 19th century, it was proposed to treat PD with oral and topical mercury and iodides. Mercury was believed to be efficacious due to the presumed link between PD and syphilis. On the contrary, iodides were believed to be effective due to their alleged curative properties. Even oral disodium phosphate was proposed as a treatment for PD back at the time. 

In the 1970s, a new treatment for Peyronie’s Disease was devised that involved injecting verapamil into the fibrous plaques. Verapamil is a calcium channel blocker that has been used to treat hypertension and other conditions for many years. Studies demonstrated that injecting verapamil into fibrous plaques could aid in the breakdown of collagen and the reduction of penile curvature.

Modern Treatments for PD 

Penile Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy has emerged as a promising and innovative approach in the treatment of Peyronie’s disease. This technique involves injecting a concentrated form of the patient’s own blood, rich in growth factors and healing properties, directly into the affected areas of the penis. The aim is to stimulate tissue regeneration and reduce the fibrous plaques associated with Peyronie’s disease. While research on the efficacy of Penile PRP therapy is ongoing, some studies suggest its potential benefits in improving penile curvature and function. It is crucial, however, for individuals considering this treatment to consult with their healthcare provider to assess its suitability and safety for their specific case. As the field of urology continues to explore innovative approaches, Penile PRP therapy, particularly through esteemed labs like Selphyl Ortho, stands out as a promising avenue in the evolving landscape of Peyronie’s disease treatments.  

As a result of technological advancements and increased understanding of this disease, PD can now be treated with a variety of methods.

Oral Medications: Pentoxifylline, colchicine, and vitamin E are used to treat Peyronie’s disease in men all over the globe. However, it is essential to note that these medications can have negative effects on the body. Before taking these medications, it is always necessary to consult an experienced medical professional.

Injections: With intralesional injections of collagenase and verapamil, plaque reduction and penile curvature can also be accomplished. 

Topical Medicines: Nitro-glycerine and potassium para-aminobenzoate, which are topical agents, may also be utilized to treat PD. 

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Nesbit Procedure: The Nesbit Procedure is a surgical procedure that entails reducing the length of the penis to reduce the curvature. 

Tunica Plication: This surgical procedure entails folding and suturing the tunica albuginea on the shorter side of the penis in order to reduce its curvature. 

Grafting: In the grafting procedure, a tissue graft is used to treat the curvature and cover the defect in the tunica albuginea.

Penile Implants. A compete prothesis is surgically implanted into the penis and the penis is manually pumped up to achieve and erection.

Penile Vacuum Pumps: Vacuum erectile devices (VED) for Peyronie’s disease or penile vacuum pumps do not target the lesions of the penis, but instead reduce several symptoms of PD. These devices extend penile tissues, resulting in a straightened penis. 

Photoactivation: This treatment aides in the healing of the body by affecting the mitochondria of the cells. It is also a modern method of control.

Shockwave Therapy: Shockwave therapy for PD is a non-invasive treatment option that utilises special shockwaves to break down plaques and enhance penis blood flow. It is a relatively recent treatment option that was initially designed to dissolve kidney stones. 

EMTT Therapy: EMTT therapy, also known as extracorporeal magnetotransduction therapy, is a non-invasive treatment technique that employs a strong magnetic field. Both EMTT therapy and shockwave therapy can be used concurrently to treat PD effectively. 

Modifications to one’s way of life, including physical exercise, a nutritious diet, weight management, and quitting smoking, can enhance men’s overall health. These activities can enhance men’s penile and overall health. 

Side effects of PD medications 

Several Peyronie’s disease treatments can have negative side effects. For instance, vitamin E overdose symptoms and side effects include haemorrhage and adverse drug interactions. Colchicine side effects may range from issues like nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach pain, muscle pain, peripheral numbness, as well as issues like bleeding, bruising, sore throat, fever, and shivers, among others. Many men must undergo surgical procedures to fully treat their PD, as this disease can be extremely stubborn and difficult to treat in some cases. Infection, swelling, and even a shortening of the penis are some of the more significant adverse effects associated with these surgical procedures. Non-surgical treatment options and penis exercises, on the other hand, do not have these adverse effects and are generally quite safe

The efficacy of shockwave therapy  

Peyronie’s disease is treatable by a variety of oral medications and surgical procedures. However, it is crucial to note that the majority of these treatment methods have a number of undesirable side effects. Some conventional non-invasive remedies are incapable of providing a permanent solution. Moreover, the majority of patients dislike surgical treatments. Shockwave therapy, on the other hand, can circumvent the majority of the risks associated with these types of treatments. Shockwave therapy was initially developed to break down kidney plaques, but physicians and researchers have since discovered that it is also effective in breaking down penile plaques, thereby minimizing penile curvature and enhancing blood flow. This treatment also has no significant deleterious effects. According to MansMatters, a UK-based clinic specialising in shockwave therapy, shockwave therapy can be highly effective in reducing penile curvature without causing significant adverse effects. This clinic also claims that EMTT therapy can boost the efficacy of shockwave therapy even further when both of these therapies are used together. In addition to offering Functional Magnetic Stimulation and NanoVi Exo, MansMatters also offers a number of other non-invasive treatments. 

So, the treatments for Peyronie’s disease have advanced considerably in recent years and with modern invasive and non-invasive treatment methods, it is now possible to fully treat this complex sexual condition.

Peyronie’s disease is a male sexual disease that causes significant penis bending and pain. PD is not a commonly known disease and is not covered in the press as frequently as other male sexual ailments such as Premature Ejaculation and Erectile Dysfunction. But, Peyronie’s disease has been around for centuries and the treatment methods for this disease have slowly but gradually advanced in modern era.

The history of PD

In 1743, French surgeon Francois Gigot de la Peyronie discovered and first described Peyronie’s disease. The initial description of the condition by Francois Gigot de la Peyronie was based on a series of cases he had observed in his own practice. He observed that males with PD typically had thickened penile tissue, resulting in a curvature and difficulties having sex during erection. Frequently, this curvature made sexual activity challenging or impossible. Peyronie also observed that the condition was more prevalent in older individuals and hypothesized that it may be associated with gout or rheumatism.

Following Peyronie’s initial description of the condition, other clinicians began to report cases of what they termed “induratio penis plastica,” or penile induration. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, the condition was inadequately understood, and numerous theories were advanced to explain its cause. Some physicians believed that Peyronie’s Disease was caused by inflammation or trauma to the penile, while others hypothesized that a bacterial or viral infection could be to blame. Later, scientists determined the disease’s two stages. There are two phases: acute and chronic.

The initial phase of Peyronie’s disease is the acute phase, which is marked by penis discomfort and inflammation. During this stage, fibrous scar tissue begins to form, causing the penis to deform or curve during erections. Curvature can be mild or severe and can occur in any direction.

During the acute phase of Peyronie’s disease, the following symptoms may be present:

• Pain or sensitivity of the genitalia

• Enlargement or inflammation

• A mass or ridge in the penis

• Dysfunction of erection

• Difficulties with sexual relations

• Depression or anxiety related to the ailment

In most cases, the acute phase of Peyronie’s disease lasts between 12 to 18 months, although it can last longer.

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The second phase of Peyronie’s disease is characterised by the stabilisation of the fibrous scar tissue, which stops developing and becomes harder. During this stage, the penis’ curvature may become more pronounced, and as a consequence, Peyronie’s disease and erectile dysfunction may worsen. In most cases, however, the discomfort and inflammation subside.

The chronic phase of Peyronie’s disease may be characterized by the following symptoms:

• The natural penile curvature during erection

• Dysfunction of erection

• Difficulties with sexual relations

• tension or melancholy due to a medical condition

An excellent source of information for a patient who has recently discovered they have Peyronie’s disease is the UK based Peyronie’s Forum

Ancient Treatments for PD 

There were not many effective remedies for Peyronie’s disease in ancient times, primarily due to a lack of knowledge about the disease and technological advancements. However, this does not imply that there were no treatments for this disease in antiquity. For instance, the person who first discovered Peyronie’s disease recommended spa treatments with mineral water for patients. Later in the 19th century, it was proposed to treat PD with oral and topical mercury and iodides. Mercury was believed to be efficacious due to the presumed link between PD and syphilis. On the contrary, iodides were believed to be effective due to their alleged curative properties. Even oral disodium phosphate was proposed as a treatment for PD back at the time. 

In the 1970s, a new treatment for Peyronie’s Disease was devised that involved injecting verapamil into the fibrous plaques. Verapamil is a calcium channel blocker that has been used to treat hypertension and other conditions for many years. Studies demonstrated that injecting verapamil into fibrous plaques could aid in the breakdown of collagen and the reduction of penile curvature.

Modern Treatments for PD 

As a result of technological advancements and increased understanding of this disease, PD can now be treated with a variety of methods.

Oral Medications: Pentoxifylline, colchicine, and vitamin E are used to treat Peyronie’s disease in men all over the globe. However, it is essential to note that these medications can have negative effects on the body. Before taking these medications, it is always necessary to consult an experienced medical professional.

Injections: With intralesional injections of collagenase and verapamil, plaque reduction and penile curvature can also be accomplished. 

Topical Medicines: Nitro-glycerine and potassium para-aminobenzoate, which are topical agents, may also be utilized to treat PD. 

Nesbit Procedure: The Nesbit Procedure is a surgical procedure that entails reducing the length of the penis to reduce the curvature. 

Tunica Plication: This surgical procedure entails folding and suturing the tunica albuginea on the shorter side of the penis in order to reduce its curvature. 

Grafting: In the grafting procedure, a tissue graft is used to treat the curvature and cover the defect in the tunica albuginea.

Penile Implants. A compete prothesis is surgically implanted into the penis and the penis is manually pumped up to achieve and erection.

Penile Vacuum Pumps: Vacuum erectile devices (VED) for Peyronie’s disease or penile vacuum pumps do not target the lesions of the penis, but instead reduce several symptoms of PD. These devices extend penile tissues, resulting in a straightened penis. 

Photoactivation: This treatment aides in the healing of the body by affecting the mitochondria of the cells. It is also a modern method of control.

Shockwave Therapy: Shockwave therapy for PD is a non-invasive treatment option that utilises special shockwaves to break down plaques and enhance penis blood flow. It is a relatively recent treatment option that was initially designed to dissolve kidney stones. 

EMTT Therapy: EMTT therapy, also known as extracorporeal magnetotransduction therapy, is a non-invasive treatment technique that employs a strong magnetic field. Both EMTT therapy and shockwave therapy can be used concurrently to treat PD effectively. 

Modifications to one’s way of life, including physical exercise, a nutritious diet, weight management, and quitting smoking, can enhance men’s overall health. These activities can enhance men’s penile and overall health. 

Side effects of PD medications 

Several Peyronie’s disease treatments can have negative side effects. For instance, vitamin E overdose symptoms and side effects include haemorrhage and adverse drug interactions. Colchicine side effects may range from issues like nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach pain, muscle pain, peripheral numbness, as well as issues like bleeding, bruising, sore throat, fever, and shivers, among others. Many men must undergo surgical procedures to fully treat their PD, as this disease can be extremely stubborn and difficult to treat in some cases. Infection, swelling, and even a shortening of the penis are some of the more significant adverse effects associated with these surgical procedures. Non-surgical treatment options and penis exercises, on the other hand, do not have these adverse effects and are generally quite safe

The efficacy of shockwave therapy  

Peyronie’s disease is treatable by a variety of oral medications and surgical procedures. However, it is crucial to note that the majority of these treatment methods have a number of undesirable side effects. Some conventional non-invasive remedies are incapable of providing a permanent solution. Moreover, the majority of patients dislike surgical treatments. Shockwave therapy, on the other hand, can circumvent the majority of the risks associated with these types of treatments. Shockwave therapy was initially developed to break down kidney plaques, but physicians and researchers have since discovered that it is also effective in breaking down penile plaques, thereby minimizing penile curvature and enhancing blood flow. This treatment also has no significant deleterious effects. According to MansMatters, a UK-based clinic specialising in shockwave therapy, shockwave therapy can be highly effective in reducing penile curvature without causing significant adverse effects. This clinic also claims that EMTT therapy can boost the efficacy of shockwave therapy even further when both of these therapies are used together. In addition to offering Functional Magnetic Stimulation and NanoVi Exo, MansMatters also offers a number of other non-invasive treatments. 

So, the treatments for Peyronie’s disease have advanced considerably in recent years and with modern invasive and non-invasive treatment methods, it is now possible to fully treat this complex sexual condition.